[SOLVED] Nexus 6 Wi-Fi Problems

While it usually performs well, Nexus 6 still receives complaints and quite a few of them feature the same topic: Nexus 6 Wi-Fi problems. If your Nexus 6 struggles to connect to the Internet via Wi-Fi, bugs could be the root of the problem and you should restart it. Other solutions include disconnecting from the network and reconnecting to it, resetting network settings, disabling Airplane Mode, checking for updates, wiping the cache partition, performing a factory reset, etc. Read to the end to learn what must be done to address the issue and put your  Nexus 6 to good use. 

What Might Have Gone Wrong 

In times of need, owners of Nexus 6 could connect to the Internet by taking advantage of Wi-Fi networks in the vicinity. However, if your Nexus 6 runs into Wi-Fi problems, it’s strongly recommended that you give these suspects some thought: 

  • Bugs.
  • Airplane Mode.
  • Obsolescence.
  • Corruption.

Actions To Take

Restart 

  • Step 1: Press and hold the Power button. 
  • Step 2: Hit Power off then allow the device to shut down all the way.
  • Step 3: Wait for a moment, press and hold the Power button then determine whether the issue persists. 

Disconnect And Reconnect 

  • Step 1: Open Settings, select Wi-Fi and choose your network. 
  • Step 2: Hit Forget. 
  • Step 3: Restart the device, connect to your network and witness the result. 

Note: Alternatively, you could toggle off the Wi-Fi switch in Settings, wait for a moment and toggle it back on. 

Reset Network Settings

  • Step 1: Open Settings, click Backup & reset and pick Network settings reset.
  • Step 2: Hit Reset Settings then enter PIN, pattern or password if prompted. 
  • Step 3: Hit Reset Settings to confirm your decision. 

Disable Airplane Mode

  • Step 1: On the home screen, swipe from top to bottom. 
  • Step 2: Locate the Airplane Mode icon then tap it once to disable it. If Airplane Mode is already disabled, enable it, wait for a moment and disable it. 
  • Step 3: See how things turn out.

Update 

  • Step 1: Open Settings, select About phone and choose System updates.
  • Step 2: If an update is available, download and install it. 
  • Step 3: After the update finishes, restart the device. 

Wipe Cache Partition 

  • Step 1: Power off the device.
  • Step 2: Press and hold Power and Volume Down buttons at the same time. 
  • Step 3: In the Fastboot screen, use Volume buttons to bring up Recovery mode then press the Power button. 
  • Step 4: As soon as the Android icon comes into view, press Power and Volume Up buttons simultaneously. 
  • Step 5: In the Recovery screen, use Volume Up/Down buttons to navigate to wipe cache partition and press the Power button once. Remember to confirm your decisions if prompted. Last but not least, back to the Recovery screen, use Volume Up/Down buttons to navigate to reboot system now and press the Power button once. 

Perform A Factory Reset 

Note: For your information, a factory reset wipe everything on your phone so it’s best to backup data beforehand. 

  • Step 1: Power off the device.
  • Step 2: Press and hold Power and Volume Down buttons at the same time. 
  • Step 3: In the Fastboot screen, use Volume buttons to bring up Recovery mode then press the Power button. 
  • Step 4: As soon as the Android icon comes into view, press Power and Volume Up buttons simultaneously. 
  • Step 5: In the Recovery screen, use Volume Up/Down buttons to wipe data/factory reset and press the Power button once. Remember to confirm your decisions if prompted.

Slow Connections: Causes And Solutions 

  • Router: If the router is experiencing issues, it’s only natural that connections would be slow. For good measure, you should take a look at your router from settings to hardware if you have slow connections. 
  • Interferences: The presence of other wireless devices in the surroundings could mess up Wi-Fi signals which leads to slow connections. For optimal speed, you should relocate wireless devices near the router as well as your phone to keep interferences to the minimum.
  • Congestion: If too many devices connect to the same network, the connection on each device is going to be slow. Depending on the situation, you could disconnect some devices from the network, connect your phone to another network, etc. 
  • Network: In case you don’t know, not all networks provide high-speed connections. If you don’t like the speed of a network, switch to another network. 
  • VPN: The use of VPN could reduce the speed, especially if the VPN server you use is slow. If you like to improve the speed, you should consider disabling VPN. 
  • Coverage: If you use cellular data instead of Wi-Fi to connect to the Internet, poor mobile coverage could cause slow connections. By moving into an open area, you would be able to boost the speed a bit. 
  • Device: Your phone is kind of slow by nature? Then it’s highly likely that the device is the one responsible for slow connections. If you have money to spend, upgrade to a more capable model. 

Insights Into Risks Of Using Public Wi-Fi Networks

  • Theft of sensitive data: Public Wi-Fi networks tend to have less-than-ideal security levels so it won’t take much work to hack them. Sometimes, hackers even intercept your connection by impersonating the network you are trying to connect to. Thus, if you connect to networks in public space carelessly, those that have malicious intent could easily steal sensitive data stored on your device. Also, via public Wi-Fi networks, others could track and collect your browsing data then sell everything to advertisers for targeted advertising.
  • Distribution of malware: Public Wi-Fi networks can be used to distribute malware to connected devices. If you don’t take precautions, malware could compromise your device and wreak havoc on it. 
  • Eavesdropping: Hackers can use packet sniffing to intercept and read your internet traffic. That allows them to capture information such as login credentials and credit card numbers.